Primary Examination SAQs

Study notes for the ANZCA Primary Examination SAQs

Neurophysiology

with 6 comments

Written by primarysaqs

December 31, 2009 at 11:52 am

6 Responses

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  1. Hi Amanda, Thanks for this great resource. However, I disagree with part of your answer to the NMDA-R description. It is not a GPCR but is a voltage-dependent, ligand gated cation channel, with high permeability for Ca2+, and lower permeability for Na+ and K+. There is no involvement of IP3/DAG. (see examiners reports for the question, 2003 & 1998). http://www.anaesthesiamcq.com/wiki/mcqwiki/index.php/Physiol-03B15

    Sarah

    January 29, 2011 at 6:37 pm

    • Hi Sarah, Great find!Changes have been made accordingly…incidentally, the metabotropic glutamate is proabably worth knowing about as gravy for the exam.. -AD

      primarysaqs

      January 30, 2011 at 7:19 pm

  2. Hi Amanda !
    Well done. Your work now is an excellent source for those preparing for Anaestheisa primary exam.!
    Can you please clarify this for me !
    You ve mentioned DAG and IP3 in the NMDA action.Is it a GPCR type of receptor !
    I thought it was ligand gated ion channel !
    Thank you .

    prasad

    April 26, 2011 at 7:03 pm

    • Hi Prasad
      NMDA receptors have an important role as both an inotropic receptor (cationic, more specifically Ca), but also as a metabotropic receptor – this is the way changes in gene expression etc occur. The extent of its role in neuroplasticity is an area of intense interest, especially in the field of persistent pain…there are many articles written on the subject, both in pain literature and the more basic sciences (you can Google this), but for the purposes of this exam, an appreciation of the complex an multifaceted role of NMDA receptors are probably all you need to know.

      Good Luck.

      primarysaqs

      May 1, 2011 at 11:34 am

  3. Hi, Amanda. Just approaching part ones and still loving the site. Small correction in the question on IOP. I think the CA inhibitor you meant to write down was Acetazolamide not Amiloride. I think we all mix those two up a bit. Cheers,

    Eddie

    February 20, 2014 at 3:07 pm

    • Not mixed up, but a typo. Thanks for the pick up! Page has been corrected.

      primarysaqs

      March 4, 2014 at 2:29 pm


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